Italians Wear Scarves

Ciao Readers and HAPPY FRIDAY! Since I am back from Italy and back to work I guess my blog will be still for a bit. But before then, I thought I’d re-blog the most-viewed post of all time (by more than 100%, though not sure why). I think I had the scarf-wearing (and confidence) down pretty well this time as two days in a row Italians approached me in the grocery store and started conversations about things in Italian, NOT English! Have a nice Spring…..until next time!

New Mexico to Italy

It’s just a fact.  Italians wear scarves.  If you want to try and pass as an Italian, wear a scarf (and don’t wear white running shoes).  Not only do they wear scarves (“sciarpe,” not to be confused with “scarpe” – shoes), but they wear them “in style.”  Last time we were in Europe, we learned to tie our scarves the way that was in style back then.  It’s hard to explain, but basically you make a slip-knot and put your head through the center (see picture, below).

I went to Italy this year all prepared with many scarves packed and started my trip tying them the “euro” way we learned in ’08/’10.  Here I am my very first couple of days (I started the trip in Milan, where my plane landed – this is on the top of the Duomo):

It soon became apparent to me that wearing a…

View original post 201 more words

Italians Wear Scarves

It’s just a fact.  Italians wear scarves.  If you want to try and pass as an Italian, wear a scarf (and don’t wear white running shoes).  Not only do they wear scarves (“sciarpe,” not to be confused with “scarpe” – shoes), but they wear them “in style.”  Last time we were in Europe, we learned to tie our scarves the way that was in style back then.  It’s hard to explain, but basically you make a slip-knot and put your head through the center (see picture, below).

I went to Italy this year all prepared with many scarves packed and started my trip tying them the “euro” way we learned in ’08/’10.  Here I am my very first couple of days (I started the trip in Milan, where my plane landed – this is on the top of the Duomo):

It soon became apparent to me that wearing a scarf this way was no longer as chic.  Most of the Italians (and other Europeans) I saw now had their scarves basically wrapped around their neck several times, with little to no extra flowing down.  Here I am stylishly wearing a scarf I got in Italy:

Now when I say “Italians wear scarves” I am being very serious – women wear scarves, MEN wear scarves, and everyone wears scarves way past (to my liking [“secondo me”]) the temperature calls for scarves.  Of course, in the warmer weather, you can wear a thinner/smaller scarf, but you’re gonna wear a scarf nonetheless.  I remember one day in Bologna it was very warm out and I decided to be a rebel and NOT wear a scarf to school.  I felt naked!  I have even taken to occasionally wearing scarves back here in Albuquerque and it’s already in the 80’s (mid+ 20’s Celsius).  Now, I am not usually one to follow the crowd, but I get all happy at the thought that if I don’t say too much and I wear a scarf, people in Florence may actual mistake me for a “real” Italian (I am actually 1/8 Italian).   So, for now, I scarf on!

%d bloggers like this: